The Top 5 Places To Have A Pint In Dublin

07 Apr 2014

One of the most attractive and entertaining aspects of any visit to Dublin is the opportunity to enjoy some of the fabulous hospitality on offer in the city, and when it comes to pubs there are plenty to choose from. It certainly isn’t compulsory to have a Guinness while in the city either, as there are some fine local ales and beers on offer here too. Here are some of the best places to stop and enjoy a quick drink during a visit to Dublin.


The Old Storehouse


While many of the pubs in Temple Bar can be hit and miss, this is one of the best that has live music and a good range of beers on offer. The live music is on every night, and there are usually several local bands and singers playing over the weekends. As well as offering a good range of drinks, the staff are friendly and the food available is tasty and reasonably priced for a pub in the city center.


Guinness Storehouse


The legendary home of Guinness no longer plays an active role in the production of the black stuff, but it is now home to a lovely museum looking at the history of the drink and how it was produced. At the very top of the museum is the Gravity Bar that provides excellent views over the city, but for those looking for a wide variety of drinks, this may not be the best place to visit. The panoramic windows provide a great backdrop for a nice pint of Guinness, and the museum tour helps to make it a wonderful place to get a taste for the history behind the drink.


O'Neill's Pub

Pic courtesy P.Arps 

For those who have been drinking at one of the chain of O'Neill's Irish themed pubs in the UK, do not despair, as this is the genuine article. Just a short distance away from the main night life area of Temple Bar, this pub has a selection of stouts and beers, along with a great whiskey bar, and also provides a good venue to enjoy live music in the evenings and on weekends.


The Bank On College Green


While this is a lovely place for some food during the day, it certainly livens up in the evening when many people find the grand surroundings and vibrant atmosphere a great attraction. High ceilings and ornate decoration date from the bar's period serving as a branch of the Bank of Ireland, while the route to the bathrooms is decorated by an old safe door that once helped to keep the money secure.




Another traditional Irish pub at the heart of the city, this is one of the liveliest places to visit for a pint in Dublin, with Fridays and Saturdays particularly busy. There is very little ostentation in the pub with the friendly service and good beer drawing the crowds, and it is said to have been a favorite haunt of many writers and artists, including Irish poet WB Yeats.


Flying To Dublin


The Irish capital is served by flights from all major airports in the UK and several smaller airports, including London Stansted, Bristol, Manchester, Birmingham, Edinburgh and Luton. Aer Lingus and Ryanair boast the largest number of services into Dublin Airport, while Cityjet and British Airways both offer London services from London City Airport and Heathrow respectively. Flights from Manchester and Birmingham are usually the cheapest when it comes to flying to Dublin with return flights often under £30, while return flights from London Airports usually available for under £60.